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Patient Data from Wellpoint Exposed to ID Theft

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Social Security numbers, pharmacy records and other personal health data from about 130,000 people covered by health insurance giant Wellpoint Inc. were left open for possible breach on the Internet, the health insurance giant confirmed Tuesday.

Wellpoint said it is not aware of any identity theft related to the problem.

Operating locally under the Unicare name, Wellpoint said customer information in several states, including Illinois, was exposed in the last year because two computer servers maintained by a vendor “were not properly secured for a period of time.” The insurer declined to name the vendor.

[Chicago Tribune]

Written by MCruz on April 20th, 2008 with 2 comments.
Read more articles on Identity Theft and Insurance and Patients.

American Family Insurance Customers At Risk

Computer equipment containing customers’ Social Security numbers and driver’s license numbers was stolen from an American Family Insurance agent’s office in Madison, WI.

It mailed letters to more than two-thousand customers alerting them to the theft at the office of an insurance agent.

It urges them to contact credit reporting agencies for information on identity theft protections.

The break-in was back in July. American Family spokesman Steve Witmer says it took the company a while to determine the contents of the missing computer and assess the risk.

Source: WBAY-TV

Written by MCruz on September 13th, 2006 with no comments.
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Sentry Insurance Customer Data Sold by Thief

Over 112,000 Sentry Insurance customers’ personal data have been stolen by a programmer hired by the company. The firm, based in Stevens Point, WI, says the US Secret Service recently arrested the thief. There were 72 individuals whose personal data, including names and Social Security numbers were sold on the Internet. Sentry Insurance is not commenting on when or how the theft was discovered.

The firm said data on an additional 112,198 claimants was also stolen, but there is no evidence their information was sold.

Sentry said it has notified all affected claimants and is providing credit monitoring services to help prevent fraudulent activity.

Source: Duluth News Tribune

Written by MCruz on July 30th, 2006 with no comments.
Read more articles on Customers and Identity Theft and Insurance.

Half Million NY Residents’ Personal Data Exposed

New Yorkers who have made claims to the special workers’ compensation fund are affected by the breach. A Chicago-based company, CS Stars (subsidiary of Marsh, Inc.) had lost track of a computer which contained the private data. The claims-management firm was hired to install software for the Special Funds Conservation Committee.

The company is offering free credit monitoring up to a year and $25,000 identity-theft insurance to those whose data were lost.

The Special Funds Conservation Committee handles workers’ compensation coverage in New York for about 56,500 disabled workers who suffer a second injury, and about 36,000 old claims that are reopened. In existence since 1938, it maintains records on about 540,000 old and current claimants, said chief executive Steven Licht.

All the names in the database, Licht said, had address, date of birth and Social Security number attached, and some also would have employer and accident information, but none had confidential medical records included. Licht also said there were copies of all the data, and claims payments had not been interrupted.

Source: Newsday.com

Update (7/25/06): Those affected by the breach should go to the NYS Workers’ Compensation Board website to obtain more information.

Update (7/26/06): The laptop was just found in a secure location.  “The computer has been located and is secure,” said Karen Allen, a spokeswoman for the Special Funds Conservation Committee.”  The FBI says they are “reasonably certain” the data was not misused.  Mercury News has the report.

Written by MCruz on July 22nd, 2006 with 2 comments.
Read more articles on Employees and Government and Identity Theft and Insurance.

AIG Customers At Risk for Identity Theft

A computer server was recently stolen from a Midwest office of American Insurance Group (AIG).  The hardware equipment contained names, Social Security numbers and medical records for 930,000 Americans.

The server contains detailed personal data from 930,000 prospective AIG customers, whose information had been forwarded to the insurance firm from 690 insurance brokers around the country. The potential customers’ employers were shopping with AIG for rates for excess medical coverage, the spokesman says, when they forwarded the personal data to AIG.

AIG has not yet notified any of the people whose personal data are on the stolen server. AIG security officials have been conducting a forensic analysis of the theft, and warned the 690 insurance brokers of the problem on May 26.

Source: MSN NBC

Written by MCruz on June 15th, 2006 with no comments.
Read more articles on Businesses and Customers and Identity Theft and Insurance.

Buckeye Community Health Plan Clients Exposed

Over 70,000 health plan members are at risk for identity theft.

The family recently received a letter from the Buckeye Community Health Plan, letting them know that several laptop computers were stolen from its Columbus headquarters.

The laptops contained personal healthcare information, including addresses, phone numbers and Social Security numbers of thousands of clients from Stark, Summit and Lucas counties.

Buckeye serves the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services.

Affected members can call Buckeye at: 866-246-4358 for more information about this incident.

Source: Newsnet5.com

Written by MCruz on June 14th, 2006 with 1 comment.
Read more articles on Employees and Identity Theft and Insurance.

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